Doctor Who is BACK TODAY!!!

doctorwho:

maddays:

CABLEVISION GOT BBCA. MY LIFE IS COMPLETE. WATCHING DW CONFIDENTIAL.

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HOW DID THIS HAPPEN

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We were waiting on the “official” announcement so that we could make our official announcement of the official announcement but the episode premieres tomorrow and we’ve already started the Doctor Who Marathon on BBC America so…

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BBC America Launches on Cablevision this week

DO

doctorwho:

I lied.

HAHHA YES!

strengthfromstruggle:

Screen shot 2011 05 27 at 1.08.13 PM Decoding Food Labels to Improve Your Diet and Performance

Shopping for your favorite foods can be confusing. Hundreds of products are available, many with versions marked with catchy labels like “light,” “low-calorie” and “organic.” At a quick glance, these  terms may seem obvious, but their meaning is actually more cryptic than you might assume.

Misconstruing such terms can lead to food choices you think are healthy, but actually are not. You could limit your intake of a critical nutrient or eat foods that contain unwanted additives or chemicals.

To make more informed food decisions, view the following list, which breaks down common food labels and their meanings:

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Low-Fat: Has three grams of fat or less per serving.

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Fat-Free: Has less than .5 grams of fat per serving.

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Light: Generally, the food item has 50 percent fewer calories than its standard version. However, it can also refer to a clearer color or 50 percent less sodium in a low-calorie and low-fat product.

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Low-Calorie: Has 40 calories or less per serving.

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Fewer Calories: Has 25 percent fewer calories than its standard version.

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100 Percent Organic: Contains no chemicals, additives, synthetics, pesticides or genetically-engineered substances.

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USDA Organic: Contains at least 95 percent organic ingredients (the remaining five percent may contain additives). The nutrition label must detail the organic and non-organic ingredients.

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Made With Organic: Contains at least 70 percent organic ingredients. The nutrition label must detail the organic and non-organic ingredients.

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Ingredients: Listed in order of weight, from highest to lowest. The first few ingredients make up the majority of the food. Top ingredients to look for: whole or 100-percent grain, a protein source [e.g., milk, whey, soy] and a vegetable or fruit. Ingredients to avoid as much as possible: “hydrogenated” or “partially-hydrogenated” oils, and sugars like high-fructose corn syrup.

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Serving size: A label’s information is based on one serving—and many packages contain more than a single serving.

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Total calories: The amount of energy per serving, measured from the combination of carbohydrates, fat and protein.

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Total fat: Aim for three grams or less per 100 calories, meaning that 30 percent or less of the food’s calories come from fat.

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Protein: This nutrient is made up of 22 amino acids, and eight of them need to be consumed through food, because your body can’t produce them. If a label lists “complete protein,” it means that food has all eight. Milk, cheese and yogurt offer complete protein.

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Sodium: The average daily recommendation is 2,300 milligrams. Athletes need this major electrolyte, because it influences muscle contraction and fluid balance in the body. Foods high in sodium include canned soups, frozen dinners, pizza, salty snacks, crackers, processed meats, cheeses and pickles.

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Dietary fiber: Aim for at least 25 grams a day of this nutrient, which contributes to feeling full. Insoluble fiber, found in whole grains, fruits and vegetables, is referred to as “nature’s scrub brush,” because it absorbs water and stimulates your large intestine to move solid materials through to keep you regular.

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Sugars: The total of naturally-occurring sugar and added simple sugars. Dairy foods and fruits contain natural sugars. Added simple sugars include high-fructose corn syrup, honey and fructose. Sugar is a simple carb, best consumed post-training, because it restores energy your body burns during intense activity. Four grams equate to a teaspoon of sugar. As noted on livestrong.com, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that sugar should comprise between 16 and 20 percent of total calories.

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Vitamins/minerals: Two to watch for are calcium and iron. Athletes need 1,300 mg of calcium daily. For iron, males require 11 mg a day, and females need 15 mg. These two nutrients play important roles in the bone-building and oxygen-carrying capacity of blood, respectively.

!!

Orientation was great! I really like the feel of USF faculty. Would really love to go there for Med School too!

Something I’m currently working on.

jayparkinsonmd:

Healthy, happy living is about eating well; being active; having close relationships; enjoying sex; taking pride in what you do for a living; optimizing your environment; and moderating sabotage.

That’s about the closest definition of health I can write.

I like this definition of health.